Award Date

1-1-1996

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Arts (MA)

Department

Communication Studies

Number of Pages

215

Abstract

Lloyd Bitzer's (1992) definition of a rhetorical situation is applied to a historical review of the rhetoric surrounding the legalization of gambling in America. The Indian Gaming Regulatory Act of 1988 invites rhetoric from tribes, the gaming industry, elected government officials, anti-gambling coalitions, and states. Consistent rhetorical participation by these parties gives significance to gambling in America. A review of the rhetoric on legalized gaming illustrates the vacillating public opinion of legalized gambling in America. This study delineates Indians' poor living condition on reservations as the existing situation initiating rhetorical discourse. While all parties continue to debate their respective positions, Nevadans' concerns lie with deficient regulatory controls on Indian gaming operations. Absent effective gaming policies and regulations, it may be anticipated that organized crime will infiltrate Indian gambling. This infiltration may lead to federal oversight of all legalized gambling in the United States, whether on or off the reservations.

Keywords

America; Arguments; Contemporary; Gambling; Legalization; Rhetorical; Situation

Controlled Subject

Rhetoric; Political science; Law

File Format

pdf

File Size

7239.68 KB

Degree Grantor

University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Language

English

Permissions

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Identifier

https://doi.org/10.25669/tgep-byzg


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