Award Date

1-1-1997

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Architecture (MArch)

Department

Architecture

First Committee Member

Zouheir Hashem.

Number of Pages

89

Abstract

The study presented herewith investigated public perceptions of buildings constructed of recycled materials. The three groups surveyed in the area of Las Vegas were the general public, Clark County School District construction management employees, and local architectural firms. Eight attributes of recycled building products were addressed in the survey, namely their availability, aesthetics, cost, maintenance, quality, health risks, life expectancy, and safety. Data collected from returned questionnaires were analyzed using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences software package. Results indicate that: (1) the general public is largely unaware of the use of these products; (2) people in all three groups who are by and large cognizant of their existence, perceive them as aesthetically acceptable, and consider them as having the same cost, maintenance, quality, health risks, life expectancy, and safety as standard building products; (3) the general public's perception of the impact of their use on the environment is positive and prefers an increase in their use; (4) The Clark County School District construction management employees, even though aware of their market availability, have not requested their use in CCSD buildings; and (5) architects are mostly aware of their availability yet generally have neither recommended nor received any requests from their clients for the use of these products. Analyses of these results, conclusions, and recommendations are also presented in this study.

Keywords

Building; Constructed; Materials; Perceptions; Public; Recycled

Controlled Subject

Architecture; Environmental sciences

File Format

pdf

File Size

2007.04 KB

Degree Grantor

University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Language

English

Permissions

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Identifier

https://doi.org/10.25669/6yy6-i2wa processed, response: 201


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