Award Date

1-1-1997

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science in Nursing (MSN)

Department

Nursing

Number of Pages

136

Abstract

Though preventable, injuries resulting from motor vehicle accidents are the leading cause of death and disability in childhood. The literature supports the efficacy of child car safety restraints, yet despite this fact, nonuse rates remain high. Using the Health Belief Model, the purpose of this descriptive correlational study was to examine the relationship between health beliefs, cues to action, selected demographics, and mothers' use of child car safety restraints among low income mothers of children less than five years of age; Locus of control, maternal seatbelt use, and child's age were demonstrated to be significant predictors of child car safety restraint use. The greater the mother's external locus of control and the more consistent the mother herself wore a seatbelt, the more consistent the use of a child car safety restraint. Use of child car safety restraints decreased as child's age increased and infants were more likely to be consistently restrained than toddlers.

Keywords

Beliefs; Car; Child; Children; Health; Mothers; Relationship; Restraints; Safety; Young

Controlled Subject

Nursing; Social psychology; Public health; Behaviorism (Psychology)

File Format

pdf

File Size

4433.92 KB

Degree Grantor

University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Language

English

Permissions

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Identifier

https://doi.org/10.25669/xqb6-ibgt


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