Award Date

1-1-1997

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science (MS)

Department

Economics

First Committee Member

Thomas M. Carroll

Number of Pages

28

Abstract

Recent welfare reform legislation imposes a five year limit on federal welfare benefits. This study examines earnings, family structure and race to determine their impact on the associated probabilities of remaining on welfare. Data of families that received AFDC in the first year of a two-year period is analyzed. In the second year, some of these families stopped receiving benefits while others continued on welfare. Based on characteristics from the first year, a logit model develops the probabilities of leaving welfare rolls in the second year. These characteristics include earnings, employment, the average state benefit, age, gender, marital status, children, education and race. The results of the model indicate that low earning, unemployed, unmarried women with children, in high-benefit states are least likely to leave welfare rolls. Findings on education and race show that having a college degree and being black also increase the likelihood of staying on welfare.

Keywords

Welfare reform; Welfare; Reform; Legislation; Federal; Benefits; Study

Controlled Subject

Economics; Public policy; Ethnology--Study and teaching

File Format

pdf

File Size

1003.52 KB

Degree Grantor

University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Language

English

Permissions

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Identifier

https://doi.org/10.25669/4q6l-04t4


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