Award Date

1-1-1994

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Arts (MA)

Department

Psychology

Number of Pages

47

Abstract

The purpose of the present research was to decrease disruptive and aggressive behaviors using videotape peer-modeling and videotape self-modeling of preschoolers who were enrolled in a Day Treatment Program for emotionally and behavioral disturbed children. A multiple baseline design was used. The children received no treatment, viewed a video of a peer engaging in appropriate behavior, then the children viewed a videotape in which they were engaging in appropriate behavior, and a follow-up phase was used. Results indicated that for disruptive behaviors videotape self-modeling may have decreased the frequency more then videotape peer-modeling did. For aggressive behavior, both videotape peer-modeling and videotape self-modeling decreased the frequency of aggressive behavior. Possible reasons for the difference in outcomes between the two interventions and the two behaviors are discussed.

Keywords

Modeling; Peer; Preschoolers; Self; Videotape

Controlled Subject

Educational psychology; Early childhood education

File Format

pdf

File Size

1699.84 KB

Degree Grantor

University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Language

English

Permissions

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Identifier

https://doi.org/10.25669/bu38-n2sm


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