Award Date

1-1-1989

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Arts (MA)

Department

Sociology

First Committee Member

James H. Frey

Number of Pages

107

Abstract

The present study contends that legislative sanctions, regardless of severity, cannot sufficiently curb the drunken driver unless they are met with the concern of an equally sanctitive public (Formby and Smykla, 1984). The explicit goal of research presented here is to report the extent and power of peer sanction surrounding potential drinking and driving situations. This goal consists of the following components: (1) to discern whether individuals are at all inclined to attempt intervention in situations of potential drunken driving, and if so, to ascertain the types of intervention techniques attempted as well as intervention settings; (2) to determine which intervention techniques tend to produce the best (i.e. most preventive) results; and (3) to establish some demographic and social psychological characteristics of those who do and do not intervene. Data used in discussing these issues are gathered from a questionnaire administered to elements of a population known for frequent drinking practices--college students. (Abstract shortened with permission of author.).

Keywords

Analysis; Control; Drinking; Driving; Intervention; Peer; Social

Controlled Subject

Social psychology; Criminology

File Format

pdf

File Size

3061.76 KB

Degree Grantor

University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Language

English

Permissions

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Identifier

https://doi.org/10.25669/p814-eo4d


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