Award Date

1-1-1995

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Arts (MA)

Department

History

Number of Pages

193

Abstract

The American Indian Religious Freedom Act has proven to be a terrible disappointment for the Indians all across the country. This act presupposed an analogy between Native American ceremonial practices and Euro-American religions, but Native American ceremonies involve a broader range social institutions than Euro-American "religion." Hence, the analogy between Indian ceremonies and Euro-American religions broke down after passage of the act, and Indians failed to receive the legal remedies sought under its provisions. The following is an attempt to address the problems associated with this act by examining the historical development of a Native American rhetoric of religious freedom in the twentieth-century.

Keywords

Act; American; Ethnologic; Freedom; History; Indian; Paper; Predecessors; Religious; Tiger

Controlled Subject

Law; Ethnology; Religious history; Ethnology--Study and teaching

File Format

pdf

File Size

5621.76 KB

Degree Grantor

University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Language

English

Permissions

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Identifier

https://doi.org/10.25669/glx2-lpi5


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