Award Date

1-1-1995

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science (MS)

Department

Geoscience

Number of Pages

105

Abstract

The purpose of this study is to assess the potential to use water chemistry parameters to determine ground water flow pathways at the south rim of Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona. South rim spring, ground, and surface waters and one north rim spring were sampled from September 1992 through September 1993. Field measurements (pH, electrical conductivity, alkalinity, temperature, total dissolved solids, and dissolved oxygen), major anion (fluoride, chloride, bromide, nitrate, phosphate, and sulfate) concentrations, selected trace element concentrations, and the ratios of the stable isotopes of oxygen and hydrogen. Major anion, trace element, and field measurement data were analyzed using the multivariate statistical technique Principal Component analysis as a quantitative means for differentiating between waters according to hydrochemistry. The analysis suggests that springs issuing from similar lithologic units and/or geographic localities have analogous chemistry; that local ground water hydrochemistry is similar to south rim springs water chemistry, and particularly those issuing from the Redwall-Muav Limestones. (Abstract shortened by UMI.).

Keywords

Arizona; Assessment; Grand Canyon; Chemistry; Flow; Ground; National Parks; Parameters; Park; Pathways; Potential; Water

Controlled Subject

Hydrology; Geochemistry; Geology

File Format

pdf

File Size

3563.52 KB

Degree Grantor

University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Language

English

Permissions

If you are the rightful copyright holder of this dissertation or thesis and wish to have the full text removed from Digital Scholarship@UNLV, please submit a request to digitalscholarship@unlv.edu and include clear identification of the work, preferably with URL.

Identifier

https://doi.org/10.25669/704g-e9f9


Share

COinS