Award Date

1-1-1995

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Arts (MA)

Department

Ethics and Policy Studies

Number of Pages

84

Abstract

This thesis examines the ethical and historical foundations for a Fully Informed Jury Amendment, legislation that recognizes the "nullification" power of the jury. The ethical discussion focuses on the dual role of the jury deliberation process paralleling the distinction between natural law and legalism. Hobbesian equity is contrasted with Aristotelian equity to further discussion of the ethical rationale for acknowledging a juror's duty to act according to his conscience for the sake of justice. The historical tradition of "trial by jury" as a political process is traced from its inception by Henry II through the present with emphasis on the jury's function as a moral check on government. It is advocated that legal protection be extended to the right of citizens to exercise the "nullification" power in order to maintain a highly regarded system of law based on equity and founded on the moral integrity of its citizens.

Keywords

Aspect; Authority; Citizenship; Forgotten; Juries; Moral

Controlled Subject

Political science; Philosophy; Law; History, Modern

File Format

pdf

File Size

3440.64 KB

Degree Grantor

University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Language

English

Permissions

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Identifier

https://doi.org/10.25669/1kl3-i1mm


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