Award Date

1-1-1995

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Arts (MA)

Department

Psychology

Number of Pages

61

Abstract

In a longitudinal study of couples during the transition to first time parenthood, I examined several hypotheses regarding expectations and the division of labor between spouses. Seventy couples expecting the birth of their first baby filled out questionnaires late in pregnancy and three months postpartum. Before the birth of their babies an experimental group participated in a marital skills training workshop. Results indicated that husbands' and wives' expectations about the post-birth division of labor differed significantly from actual post-birth division of labor. This discrepancy affected marital satisfaction for wives but not for their husbands. The discrepancy also affected spouses' satisfaction with the post-birth division of labor. There was no relationship between marital satisfaction and satisfaction with the post-birth division of labor. The marital skills training workshop was not effective in mediating satisfaction with post-birth division of labor.

Keywords

Discrepancies; Division; Effects; Labor; Marital; Parenthood; Satisfaction; Transition

Controlled Subject

Social psychology; Social psychology; Women's studies

File Format

pdf

File Size

1320.96 KB

Degree Grantor

University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Language

English

Permissions

If you are the rightful copyright holder of this dissertation or thesis and wish to have the full text removed from Digital Scholarship@UNLV, please submit a request to digitalscholarship@unlv.edu and include clear identification of the work, preferably with URL.

Identifier

https://doi.org/10.25669/qrzh-m88a


Share

COinS