Award Date

1-1-1995

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Arts (MA)

Department

Anthropology

Number of Pages

179

Abstract

Vegetal remains from radiocarbon-dated ancient packrat middens were used to develop an early and middle Holocene paleoclimate sequence from the Mojave Desert. Identified species from both modern and ancient middens were tabulated by elevation range based on modern analogs to estimate the modern equivalent of the elevations of ancient middens. Differences of these reconstructed vegetation elevations relative to modern elevations of vegetation are ordered chronologically, after correction for modern midden data, creating a paleoclimate reconstruction. The reliably-dated history of human occupation at four sites on Fort Irwin in the Mojave desert are compared with the paleoclimate reconstruction for an evaluation of corresponding trends. Relative percentages of dietary resources (large mammals, small mammals, reptiles, and mussels), and artifact categories (projectile points, biface, uniface and millingstone tools) are compared with the paleoclimate record. Corresponding trends indicate a relationship between behavioral adaptation by human occupants and changes in climate.

Keywords

Adaptation; Analysis; Environmental; Human; Middens; Packrat; Reconstruction

Controlled Subject

Archaeology; Paleobotany; Indians of North America--Study and teaching

File Format

pdf

File Size

5160.96 KB

Degree Grantor

University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Language

English

Permissions

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Identifier

https://doi.org/10.25669/quca-h8ub


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