Award Date

1-1-1995

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Arts (MA)

Department

English

Number of Pages

120

Abstract

William Faulkner claimed that his fiction "failed" to show that "man will prevail," the standard that he set for literature in his Nobel Prize acceptance speech. However, this statement and others by Faulkner can be misleading without an understanding of Faulkner's terms. A study of his speeches, essays, public letters, and interviews (Faulkner's public voice) in conjunction with his major fiction (his poetic voice) clarifies what Faulkner meant by "immortality," "evil," "fear," and "failure" and thereby demonstrates that both Faulkner's fiction and his nonfiction do in fact illustrate his belief that "man will prevail.".

Keywords

Condition; Discussion; Faulkner; Human; Poetic; Public Voices; William

Controlled Subject

American literature

File Format

pdf

File Size

4587.52 KB

Degree Grantor

University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Language

English

Permissions

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Identifier

https://doi.org/10.25669/nvux-2sak


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