Award Date

1-1-1996

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Arts (MA)

Department

Political Science

Number of Pages

152

Abstract

Nuclear Diffusion: A Rethinking of Horizontal Nuclear Weapons Proliferation examines the spread of nuclear weapons throughout the nuclear age. What is pondered are the specific reasons why a state would pursue a nuclear weapons deterrent. For example, are there identifiable reasons or conditions that explain horizontal nuclear weapons proliferation? While numerous arguments have been made for why countries proliferate, this piece posits a simple assumption; A non-nuclear state is inclined to proliferate because of the dramatic nature of the nuclear threat. The imperiled non-nuclear state prefers to proliferate as only the nuclear deterrent ensures relative security in an anarchic nuclear-armed world. Whereas peace may prevail in the absence of nuclear weapons, relative security demands the imperilled state to question whether it needs nuclear weapons. Should a state desire to remove vulnerability, it is the unfortunate reality of the nuclear age that nuclear peace must begin and end with the nuclear weapon.

Keywords

Diffusion; Nation; Nuclear; States

Controlled Subject

International law

File Format

pdf

File Size

3737.6 KB

Degree Grantor

University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Language

English

Permissions

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Identifier

https://doi.org/10.25669/7a76-0beo


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