Award Date

1-1-1999

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Arts (MA)

Department

Criminal Justice

First Committee Member

Richard McCorkle

Number of Pages

83

Abstract

The number of women in prison is increasing at an alarming rate in the United States today. Because nearly 75 percent of incarcerated women are mothers of minor children, the issue of maintaining family relations deserves special attention. This study examines child visitation and its relationship to female behavior inside the priSon If women who receive visits adjust more easily to prison life, prison administrators would be wise to note these benefits; Data was collected at a private female prison in North Las Vegas, Nevada. Information on visitation and disciplinary infractions was gathered from inmate files and visitation records at the facility. Logistic regression was used to assess the impact of child visitation on inmate behavior. The results indicate that few women receive visits from their children while in prison, and visitation was not a significant predictor of inmate misconduct.

Keywords

Behavior; Children; Influence; Inmates; Prison; Visits; Women

Controlled Subject

Criminology; Women's studies; Social psychology; Behaviorism (Psychology)

File Format

pdf

File Size

2181.12 KB

Degree Grantor

University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Language

English

Permissions

If you are the rightful copyright holder of this dissertation or thesis and wish to have the full text removed from Digital Scholarship@UNLV, please submit a request to digitalscholarship@unlv.edu and include clear identification of the work, preferably with URL.

Identifier

https://doi.org/10.25669/i5f4-7ki6


Share

COinS