Award Date

May 2019

Degree Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Department

Psychology

First Committee Member

Colleen Parks

Second Committee Member

Mark Ashcraft

Third Committee Member

David Copeland

Fourth Committee Member

Carolanne Kardash

Number of Pages

44

Abstract

Accessing a previously consolidated memory trace brings it back into a labile state where it must then undergo a re-stabilization process known as reconsolidation. During this process memories are susceptible to interference and may be updated with new information. Reconsolidation has been demonstrated in animals as well as in the procedural and episodic human memory systems. However, it is still unclear when the effect will occur. Some studies suggest that reconsolidation is only necessary when new information is presented in the same spatial context or when prediction error occurs. More recent work has provided evidence that reconsolidation could be due to state dependent learning. Here, we aim to determine if an existing cognitive phenomenon, such as state dependent learning, can explain various reconsolidation effects. Experiment 1 examined that possibility using mood as internal states and then matching or mismatching moods during select study days and test. Experiment 2 further expanded on this possibility by matching (or mismatching) states on all days throughout the experiment.

Keywords

Learning; Memory; Reconsolidation

Disciplines

Cognitive Psychology

Language

English


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