Title

Can Computers Teach Social Skills to Children? Examining the Efficacy of “The Social Express” in an African-American Sample

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

1-13-2020

Publication Title

Contemporary School Psychology

Volume

24

Issue

1

First page number:

1

Last page number:

11

Abstract

This study examined the efficacy of a computer-based social skills training program, The Social Express. Independent researchers evaluated the program at both a school-wide level (Tier 1) and at a referred group level (Tier 2). The sample included third-, fourth-, and fifth-grade students in a Title 1 public school with a 100% African-American population. At the Tier 1 level, pre-post (immediate) comparisons on a social skills rating scale indicated statistically significant differences by group at the α = .10 level (p = 0.058). A significant Tier 1 quadratic effect for time (pre-test, post-test (immediate), post-test [delayed]) was found (p = 0.029) as well. At the Tier 2 level, pre-post comparisons indicated no statistically significant group improvement. Pre-post comparisons at the individual level found that about 39% of the children had statistically significant improvement in social skills, with 9% indicating a decrease in problem behaviors.

Keywords

Technology; Social-Emotional Learning; Social Skills Training; School-Based Interventions; Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports (PBIS)

Disciplines

Psychology | School Psychology | Social and Behavioral Sciences

Language

English

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