Document Type

Book Review

Publication Date

5-6-2020

Publication Title

Revista Hispánica Moderna

Volume

73

Issue

1

First page number:

139

Last page number:

141

Abstract

Elizabeth Wright begins her study of Juan Latino and his epic poem about Lepanto with a full historical-literary contextualization centered on a geographical locus, Granada, that serves to both frame and deepen the poet’s life story as well as his work. The volume is divided into two overarching sections, with the first, “From Slave to Freedman in Granada,” comprised of two chapters: one that considers Latino’s birth, education and situation in Granada, and a second that [End Page 139] concentrates on the Civil War that marked, as Wright clearly and convincingly explains, both the city and the man. Here, Wright explains her choice to use the contemporaneous phrase Civil War, which she takes from Ginés Pérez de Hita, rather than what scholars today call the Second Revolt of the Alpujarras, or the Morisco Revolt. Her reasoning is sound, and provides a marker for her approach throughout the volume: she studies the poet and his work from within the time frame, not only including but also trusting the multiple voices from historical and archival sources that enrich her study.

Keywords

Juan Latino; The Song of Juan of Austria; Epic; Lepanto; Granada; Race; Religion; Spanish empire

Disciplines

Race and Ethnicity | Sociology of Religion

File Format

pdf

File Size

264 KB

Language

English

Available for download on Thursday, May 06, 2021


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