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Description

Why are there so few women on the European Union’s highest court, the European Court of Justice (ECJ)? Answering this question is fundamental to understanding how justices to the ECJ are appointed, how they represent Europeans in general and women in particular. In our article, recently published in the journal Politics, Groups and Identities, we find that pre-nomination career experience is associate with gender imbalances in the ECJ. In particular, we find that ECJ judges from member states where there is a tradition of judicial engagement with policy making judicial nominees with past experiences working in government ministries are less likely to be women. In contrast, ECJ judges from those member states where judicial review occurs outside the usual judicial structure, ECJ judges with experience working in government ministries are more like to be women.

Publication Date

1-2019

Publisher

Women's Research Institute of Nevada (WRIN)

Language

English

Keywords

Gender; Representation; Bias; European Court of Justice; Judicial selection

Disciplines

Arts and Humanities | Judges | Women's Studies

Volume

19

Issue

1

File Format

PDF

File Size

394 Kb

Where are the Women? Legal Traditions and Descriptive Representation on the European Court of Justice


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