Location

Greenspun College of Urban Affairs Lobby

Description

Childhood sexual abuse (CSA) is a significant trauma that affects a person’s self-concept and ability to form healthy intimate relationships later in adulthood. Approximately 20% of adults who experienced childhood sexual abuse go on to evidence serious psychopathology in adulthood (Harway & Faulk, 2005). Knowledge of how relationship partners affect the healing of the survivor may be very beneficial to couples’ therapists, to survivors themselves, and to their intimate partners. The purpose of this qualitative study is to increase understanding of the survivor’s experience of what is helpful and what is counterproductive in their healing process within the construct of their couple relationship. The results of this study may provide useful information for CSA survivors, their partners, and mental health professionals in their work with individuals and couples who have experienced CSA.

Keywords

Adult child sexual abuse victims; Child sexual abuse; Couples – Psychology; Couples therapy; Spouses of adult child sexual abuse victims

Disciplines

Community-Based Research | Counseling Psychology | Family, Life Course, and Society | Interpersonal and Small Group Communication

Language

English

Comments

File: Poster

Attached file: Abstract

 
Apr 15th, 1:00 PM Apr 15th, 3:00 PM

Survivors of Childhood Sexual Abuse:What Heals and What Hurts in a Couple Relationship

Greenspun College of Urban Affairs Lobby

Childhood sexual abuse (CSA) is a significant trauma that affects a person’s self-concept and ability to form healthy intimate relationships later in adulthood. Approximately 20% of adults who experienced childhood sexual abuse go on to evidence serious psychopathology in adulthood (Harway & Faulk, 2005). Knowledge of how relationship partners affect the healing of the survivor may be very beneficial to couples’ therapists, to survivors themselves, and to their intimate partners. The purpose of this qualitative study is to increase understanding of the survivor’s experience of what is helpful and what is counterproductive in their healing process within the construct of their couple relationship. The results of this study may provide useful information for CSA survivors, their partners, and mental health professionals in their work with individuals and couples who have experienced CSA.