Title

Racial and Ethnic Differences in Knowledge and Willingness to Participate in HIV Vaccine Trials in an Urban Population in the Southeastern US

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

2-1-2006

Publication Title

International Journal of STD and AIDS

Volume

17

Issue

2

First page number:

99

Last page number:

102

Abstract

Racial/ethnic minorities in the Southeastern USA are disproportionately affected by HIV, and would benefit from a preventive vaccine. We conducted a cross-sectional survey of 220 community college students in Atlanta to evaluate racial/ethnic differences in knowledge and willingness to participate in HIV vaccine trials. Willingness to participate did not differ by race/ethnicity, age, or gender, and was not associated with knowledge. African-Americans and Asians were more likely than Whites to: believe that an HIV vaccine exists, but is being withheld from the public; believe that AIDS was caused by a government conspiracy; feel that having other participants and investigators of their ethnic background in the trial was important. Misconceptions regarding HIV vaccines are common and differ by race/ethnicity. However, willingness to participate was not associated with knowledge or race/ethnicity. Efforts to increase participation should address the ethnic diversity of the trial personnel, and education to eliminate misconceptions about HIV vaccines and trials.

Keywords

HIV infection; Vaccine; Clinical trials; Knowledge; Attitude; Practice study; Willingness to participate

Disciplines

Clinical Trials | Immunology and Infectious Disease | Virology

Language

English

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