Submission Type

Poster

Submission Title

Co-morbidity of Behavioral Addictions in Gambling Disorder and Its Relationship to Impulsivity

Session Title

Mid-morning Break and Poster Sessions: FEATURED POSTERS

Location

Caesars Palace, Las Vegas, Nevada

Start Date

29-5-2019 10:25 AM

End Date

29-5-2019 11:00 AM

Disciplines

Psychology

Abstract

Abstract (200 Words):

It is well established that gambling disorder frequently co-occurs with other substance use disorders. Yet, relatively few studies have examined the co-morbidity of gambling disorder with other behavioral addictions. The present study investigated the association between gambling disorder and behavioral addictions in a large sample of community recruited gamblers (N= 564). The Problem Gambling Severity Index provided a measure of disordered gambling, whereas the Behavioral Addiction Measure was used to assess a wide array of behavioral addictions. Furthermore, we examined whether facets of impulsivity as measured by the UPPS-P differentiated gamblers with and without co-morbid behavioral addictions. Of the total sample, 141 (25%) were classified as likely having a gambling disorder. A significant portion of participants with gambling disorder also presented with a co-morbid behavioral addiction (n = 60, 42.6%). The most frequently co-morbid behavioral addictions were shopping (19.1%), sex (15.6%), and gaming (14.9%). Participants with a co-morbid gambling and behavioral addiction reported significantly higher levels of positive urgency and sensation seeking. The results suggest that behavioral addictions are a common co-morbidity in individuals with a gambling disorder and that impulsivity may represent a shared risk factor for both gambling and behavioral addictions.

Implications (50 words): The results suggest that greater clinical attention is warranted in the screening and treatment of co-morbid gambling and behavioral addictions given their high co-occurrence. Furthermore, these findings indicate that impulsivity may represent a potential transdiagnostic mechanism in both gambling disorder and behavioral addictions.

Keywords

Gambling disorder, Behavioral addictions, Impulsivity, Co-morbidity

Author Bio

Chelsea L. Fitzpatrick: is a MSc student in Experimental Psychology at the University of Calgary. Her research interests include assessing the co-morbidity of gambling and other addictive behaviors as well as their characteristics. Furthermore, her research investigates the attentional biases of people with gambling disorder to gambling cues as well as other natural competing rewards (e.g., food, sex).

Daniel S. McGrath: is an Assistant Professor at the University of Calgary and the Alberta Gambling Research Institute Chair in gambling research. His research program is focused on the behavioral pharmacology of addiction and disordered gambling. The purpose of this work is to better understand the interaction between use of addictive substances as well as the role of cognitive biases in addictions.

Funding Sources

None

Competing Interests

None

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May 29th, 10:25 AM May 29th, 11:00 AM

Co-morbidity of Behavioral Addictions in Gambling Disorder and Its Relationship to Impulsivity

Caesars Palace, Las Vegas, Nevada

Abstract (200 Words):

It is well established that gambling disorder frequently co-occurs with other substance use disorders. Yet, relatively few studies have examined the co-morbidity of gambling disorder with other behavioral addictions. The present study investigated the association between gambling disorder and behavioral addictions in a large sample of community recruited gamblers (N= 564). The Problem Gambling Severity Index provided a measure of disordered gambling, whereas the Behavioral Addiction Measure was used to assess a wide array of behavioral addictions. Furthermore, we examined whether facets of impulsivity as measured by the UPPS-P differentiated gamblers with and without co-morbid behavioral addictions. Of the total sample, 141 (25%) were classified as likely having a gambling disorder. A significant portion of participants with gambling disorder also presented with a co-morbid behavioral addiction (n = 60, 42.6%). The most frequently co-morbid behavioral addictions were shopping (19.1%), sex (15.6%), and gaming (14.9%). Participants with a co-morbid gambling and behavioral addiction reported significantly higher levels of positive urgency and sensation seeking. The results suggest that behavioral addictions are a common co-morbidity in individuals with a gambling disorder and that impulsivity may represent a shared risk factor for both gambling and behavioral addictions.

Implications (50 words): The results suggest that greater clinical attention is warranted in the screening and treatment of co-morbid gambling and behavioral addictions given their high co-occurrence. Furthermore, these findings indicate that impulsivity may represent a potential transdiagnostic mechanism in both gambling disorder and behavioral addictions.