Title

Can a Brief, Digital Skill Training Intervention Help Undergraduates "Learn to Learn" and Improve Their STEM Achievement?

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

5-1-2020

Publication Title

Journal of Educational Psychology

Volume

112

Issue

4

First page number:

765

Last page number:

781

Abstract

Students who drop out of their science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) majors commonly report that they lack skills critical to STEM learning and career pursuits. Many training programs exist to develop students’ learning skills and they typically achieve small to medium effects on behaviors and performance. However, these programs require large investments of students’ and instructors’ time and effort, which limits their applicability to large lecture course formats commonly employed in early undergraduate STEM coursework. This study examined whether brief, digital training modules designed to help students apply learning strategies and self-regulated learning principles effectively in their STEM courses can impact students’ behaviors and performance in a large biology lecture course. Results indicate that a 2-hr Science of Learning to Learn training had significant effects on students’ use of resources for planning, monitoring, and strategy use, and improved scores on quizzes and exams. These findings indicate that a brief, self-guided, online training can increase desirable learning behaviors and improve STEM performance with minimal cost to learners or instructors. Implications for future design of interventions and their provision to students in need of support are discussed. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2020 APA, all rights reserved)

Keywords

Cognitive strategies; Digital learning environments; Self-regulated learning; Skill training; STEM education

Disciplines

Educational Psychology | Science and Mathematics Education | Science and Technology Studies

Language

English

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