Award Date

5-2012

Degree Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Physical Therapy (DPT)

Department

Physical Therapy

Number of Pages

26

Abstract

Purpose. The purpose of this study was to determine the stretching duration (15, 30, 60 seconds) with or without a dynamic warm-up that resulted in the longest lasting acute effects in hamstring flexibility.

Subjects. Forty subjects (17 male, 23 female) (age: 20-35 years) were selected to participate in this study using a sample of convenience from university graduate students.

Methods. This study contained 7 treatment conditions in which each subject completed in random order. Three groups consisted of a 5-minute treadmill warm-up at a self-selected velocity (SSV) followed by one of three stretching durations (15, 30, or 60 sec). Three other groups consisted of only one of the three stretching conditions without the treadmill warm-up. The final group consisted of only walking for 5 min on the treadmill at SSV without receiving a static stretch. A baseline passive knee extension range of motion (ROM) was taken in supine followed by the stretching/treadmill intervention. Subsequent knee ROM measurements were taken each minute until knee ROM returned to baseline.

Results. The presence of treadmill warm-up resulted in significantly greater duration of increased hamstring ROM (p≤0.0005). Within the four treadmill conditions, there was no significant difference in duration of increased hamstring ROM. There was no observed statistically significant difference among the three static stretch groups with no treadmill warm-up as well.

Conclusion. The results suggest that a dynamic warm-up with or without a static stretch led to the longest duration of acute increase in hamstring ROM.

Keywords

Exercise; Hamstring muscle; Sports physical therapy; Stretching exercises

Disciplines

Kinesiotherapy | Physical Therapy | Physiotherapy | Sports Sciences

Language

English

Comments

Incomplete paper data


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