Award Date

8-1-2013

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Arts (MA)

Department

History

First Committee Member

Deirdre Clemente

Second Committee Member

Andy Kirk

Third Committee Member

William Bauer

Fourth Committee Member

Christine Batson

Number of Pages

69

Abstract

This thesis examines the ways the American fashion industry and fashion publications appropriated aspects of Indian cultures as marketing tools from 1940 to 1968 and the ways representations stereotypes created through fashion outlets denoted American and individual, rather than Native, identity. Representational stereotypes created at the turn of the twentieth century provided fashion merchandisers and sellers with a home-grown marketing scheme, while the development of an American fashion industry based on mass-produced, ready-to-wear sportswear led to nation-wide dissemination and use of "Indian" colors, patterns, and designs.

Keywords

Advertising – Fashion; Exoticism in fashion; Fashion; Fashion design; History; Indians of North America – Ethnic identity; United States

Disciplines

American Studies | Fashion Business | Fashion Design | History | Marketing | United States History

Language

English


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