Award Date

12-1999

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Bachelor of Arts

Department

Environmental Science

Number of Pages

30

Abstract

A 100 meter X 100 meter study site was chosen at White Rock Springs in Red Rock Canyon National Conservation Area, Nevada. To examine Syntrichia caninervis, a desert crustal moss, reciprocal transplantations (20 mm and 40 mm diameter cores) were performed between shaded to shaded, exposed to exposed, and shaded to exposed microsites to determine if it was possible to transplant the study organism with reasonable survivorship. Transplants were inspected following rain events for percent hydration, number of dead stems, and change in percent cover. Data indicated that there was a low mortality rate of S. caninervis stems, and few transplants reduced in percent cover over the course of the year-long study. Therefore, it was determined that cores of S. caninervis are able to be reciprocally transplanted. Also, microhabitat conditions and core size do not significantly effect transplantation success.

Keywords

Bryology; Cryptobiotic soils; Mosses; Red Rock Canyon National Conservation Area; Nevada; Microhabitat conditions; Mojave desert; Reciprocally transplanted; Survival rates; Syntrichia caninervis; White Rock Springs

Disciplines

Desert Ecology | Environmental Sciences | Plant Sciences

Language

English


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