Award Date

5-1-2015

Degree Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Nursing (ND)

Department

Nursing

First Committee Member

Patricia Alpert

Second Committee Member

Patricia Alpert

Third Committee Member

Jillian Inouye

Fourth Committee Member

Richard Tandy

Number of Pages

58

Abstract

In the United States 26 million people are affected by diabetes, which can result in microvascular and macrovascular complications. As a consequence, once a person is diagnosed with diabetes, aggressive clinical management is imperative to minimize poor glycemic control’s devastating outcomes. However, for some patients reaching optimum blood glucose levels is challenging due to the complexity of diabetes’ care. In order for patients with diabetes to achieve good blood glucose control, they must engage in self-care activities that include routine blood glucose checks, dietary control, physical activity, and routine medical provider visits, simultaneously with their medication regimen. Diabetes associated self-care activities aimed to reach good blood glucose control can be hindered by multiple factors – one of them being shift work. Thus, by better understanding the impact that shift work has on diabetes care, health care providers can formulate meaningful treatment plans to meet the needs of each diabetic patient – including diabetic evening/night workers who face additional challenges.

Keywords

Diabetes; Self-care, Health; Shift systems

Disciplines

Nursing

Language

English


Included in

Nursing Commons

Share

COinS