Award Date

5-2003

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Bachelor of Arts

Department

Environmental Science

Advisor 1

Doug Bennett, Conservation Manager, Southern Nevada Water Authority-Content Advisor

Advisor 2

Helen R. Neill, Chair and Assoc. Professor, Environmental Studies

Advisor 3

Krystyna Stave, Assoc. Professor, Environmental Studies

Number of Pages

23

Abstract

The Las Vegas Valley is one of the driest regions in the southwest United States. Due to limited water supplies from the Colorado River, rainfall, and groundwater sources, the water requirements of the valley’s growing population is slated to surpass the current available water supply. The purpose of this comparative study is to quantify the amount of consumptive water used at a major Las Vegas resort/casino in one year. This, being of importance, because of the resort/casino industry’s role as one of the largest, most visible, and most resource intensive industries in the Las Vegas valley. The goal of this project is to study the impact of this industry’s consumptive water usage on the overall water availability in the Las Vegas valley. This project was completed by researching case studies and reports of water use in related industries, water consumption and sewer outflow records, and water conservation literature. The results of the study show that consumptive water use at the Mirage Hotel and the Mandalay Bay Resort & Casino is much less than previously estimated, concluding that the impact this industry makes on the available water supply for the Las Vegas valley is also much smaller than previously estimated.

Keywords

Las Vegas Valley (Nev.); Mandalay Bay Resort & Casino; Mirage Casino; Nevada; Tourism; Water consumption; Water supply

Disciplines

Environmental Policy | Environmental Sciences | Gaming and Casino Operations Management | Hospitality Administration and Management | Natural Resource Economics | Natural Resources and Conservation | Tourism | Water Resource Management

Language

English