Award Date

12-1-2016

Degree Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Department

Sociology

First Committee Member

Barbara G. Brents

Second Committee Member

David R. Dickens

Third Committee Member

Robert Futrell

Fourth Committee Member

John Tuman

Number of Pages

156

Abstract

This dissertation set out to explore how specific aspects of globalization affect the growth and development of particular militant neo-fundamentalist social movements and in what ways globalization affect the resources and collective identity of these movements. To examine this, I conducted ethnographic and archival research and in-depth interviews with 40 activists in the UAMSHO (AWAKENING) group in Zanzibar, which is associated with the rise of violent activities since the first multiparty elections, held in 1995. Most of these activities have been associated with the UAMSHO (AWAKENING) group, that adheres to strict neo-fundamentalist views of Islam, and which calls for Zanzibar to secede from Tanzania, the union with the mainland. In this research, I found that in the context of political turmoil and economic challenges, resource flows from both public and private financiers from the Middle-Eastern States, has deeply shaped UAMSHO's collective identity and mobilization patterns that has increasingly emphasized on revolutionary Islamic neo-fundamentalism ideals.

Keywords

Collective Identity; Foreign aid; Globalization; Neo fundamentalism; Social Movements; Technology

Disciplines

Sociology

Language

English

Available for download on Friday, December 15, 2017


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