Award Date

5-2010

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Arts in Communication Studies

Department

Communication

First Committee Member

David Henry, Co-Chair

Second Committee Member

Tara Emmers-Sommer, Co-Chair

Third Committee Member

Donovan Conley

Graduate Faculty Representative

David Schmoeller

Number of Pages

152

Abstract

Gojira, commonly known as the "original" Godzilla movie, is a clear commentary on the horrors the Japanese people suffered during and after the dropping of nuclear bombs in their country at the end of World War II. The intent of this thesis is to demonstrate that Gojira is a rhetorical experience that permitted the Japanese to discuss the un-discussable--namely, the destruction of Japan caused by the awakening of the American "monster" of war and nuclear weapons. The thesis is argued in four chapters. Chapter one is the prospectus, chapter two provides historical context of the emergence of nuclear culture, chapter three examines the film thematically from a psychoanalytic and narrative framework within its historical context while explaining its rhetorical significance, and chapter four serves as a conclusion. It is hoped that this project will contribute to the body of rhetorical studies of film as well as communication research related to nuclear weapons research and use.

Keywords

Atomic bomb victims; Film; Godzilla (Fictitious character); Godzilla films; Gojira; Hibakusha; Nuclear warfare – Social aspects; Rhetoric; Science-fiction films

Language

English

Comments

Related poster session: http://digitalscholarship.unlv.edu/grad_symposium/2010/april15/22/


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