Award Date

8-2010

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Arts in Psychology

Department

Psychology

First Committee Member

Christopher Heavey, Chair

Second Committee Member

Russell Hurlburt,

Third Committee Member

Jeffrey Kern

Graduate Faculty Representative

Joel Leiberman

Number of Pages

77

Abstract

This study provides a survey of the phenomena of normal, everyday inner experience using the Descriptive Experience Sampling (DES) method. Results demonstrated that five types of inner experience (sensory awareness, feeling, unsymbolized thinking, inner seeing, and inner speech) occurred in approximately one-quarter of sampled moments and that there were significant individual differences regarding the frequency with which subjects experienced these phenomena. Three new dimensions (richness of inner experience, the number of experiences present, and the overall valence of the experience) along which inner experience could be characterized were identified and used reliably to characterize moments of experience. Finally, although there was some agreement in subject and interviewer perceptions of the ability to capture and report experience, it was determined that these ratings could not be used to determine the fidelity of reports or descriptions of inner experience.

Keywords

Introspection

Disciplines

Clinical Psychology | Cognition and Perception

Language

English


Share

COinS