Award Date

2009

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science in Nursing (MSN)

Department

Nursing

Advisor 1

Yu Xu, Committee Chair

First Committee Member

Mary Bondmass

Second Committee Member

Alan Jauregui

Graduate Faculty Representative

Emily Lin

Number of Pages

76

Abstract

The current nursing shortage has impacted the profession and resulted in desperate recruitment of immigrant nurses to work in the U.S. Low job satisfaction is a factor implicated for the high nurse turnover rates, which contributes to further shortages and recruitment. Satisfaction amongst all nurses has been assessed in past research to address these issues; however no research per se has compared job satisfaction of nurses who obtained their nursing education in the U.S. to nurses who obtained education in other countries. It was the purpose of this study to compare these groups to identify any differences in job satisfaction. A survey on job satisfaction was conducted at two hospitals in Las Vegas, Nevada. Data found no significant difference between U.S. educated nurses and foreign educated nurses' (FENs) total satisfaction. However, significant differences were revealed when satisfaction items were broken into subscales. U.S. educated nurses were more satisfied with the extrinsic reward items. Findings from this study can be utilized to improve the environment for all nurses, in particular the growing population of FENs who receive little attention both in the healthcare setting and in past research.

Keywords

United States

Disciplines

Nursing

Language

English


Included in

Nursing Commons

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