Award Date

1-1-2001

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science (MS)

Department

Kinesiology

First Committee Member

Mark A. Guadagnoli

Number of Pages

60

Abstract

The current study was designed to elucidate the role of practice on speech production. Specifically, this investigation examined the effects of a distributed practice schedule on speech productions in young children and adults. Unlike the practice period used in previous studies, the practice session utilized in this investigation was spread out over one week (distributed over time), in which participants were required to practice on three different occasions before being retested. Therefore, the purpose of this investigation is to examine the notion of a developmental trend of coarticulation in children by verifying whether or not speech production strategies as exhibited by coarticulatory interactions are influenced by a distributed practice schedule. Participants were three-year olds, eight-year olds, and adults who were pre-tested, trained for one week, and post-tested. The data substantiates the developmental coarticulatory effects across age groups and demonstrated that this coarticulation can be affected by practice.

Keywords

Adults; Children; Coarticulatory; Effects; Interactions; Motor; Practices; Speech

Controlled Subject

Speech therapy; Developmental biology

File Format

pdf

File Size

1720.32 KB

Degree Grantor

University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Language

English

Permissions

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Identifier

https://doi.org/10.25669/aelq-wc0s


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