Award Date

1-1-2005

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Arts (MA)

Department

History

First Committee Member

Willard H. Rollings

Number of Pages

115

Abstract

The Fort Mojave Indians of California and Mohave Indians of Arizona were once united on their aboriginal territory. Their lifestyle was impacted by interaction with the Spanish, fur trappers, military explorers and emigrant parties; Spanish interaction with the Mojave in the 1600s resulted in little change. The fur trappers of the 1820s generally lacked cultural awareness and respect of Mojave resources. Military expeditions along the 35th parallel into Mojave territory were generally well received and aided by some Mojave, while other Mojave were cautious of the "foreign invaders." Emigrant parties soon followed, causing alarm among the Mojave as they believed the emigrants would settle. The Mojave killed several emigrants resulting in the U.S. Military stepping in and pressuring the Mojave to surrender; Following the surrender, the philosophical division deepened with Arateve's faction cooperating with the military and relocating to Parker Arizona, while Homose quahote's faction remained on their aboriginal territory.

Keywords

Arizona; California; Factionalism; Indians; Mojave; Political

Controlled Subject

Mohave Indians; United States; History

File Format

pdf

File Size

3287.04 KB

Degree Grantor

University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Language

English

Permissions

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Identifier

https://doi.org/10.25669/rmpp-5mma


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