Award Date

1-1-2006

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science (MS)

Department

Hotel Administration

First Committee Member

Clark Kincaid

Number of Pages

99

Abstract

This exploratory study focuses on the training practices and procedures of branded multi-unit restaurants. The study is specifically focused on aspects of training as they relate to the position of multi-unit managers (MUMs). The goal of the paper is to investigate current MUM training programs and trends. Very little literature exists on the specific topic of this study. A literature review focuses on three areas: the nature of the multi-unit restaurant industry; the definition and role of the multi-unit manager; and the need for and importance of training the MUM. Descriptions of current training programs in place at branded multi-unit foodservice operations are also reviewed. A survey instrument was designed, and interviews with executives in the multi-unit restaurant industry were administered. Seven executives from the top 100 multi-unit restaurant organizations were interviewed. The interviews were analyzed using qualitative software. Conclusions are presented on the general state of training and the types of programs presently used with multi-unit managers. Specific training was often conducted in both group and individual settings. Common group training approaches were structured, and often held as some form of class, meeting, or seminar. Individual training often included a one-on-one component in the form of mentoring, shadowing, or coaching. Training content was explored, and included people and business skills training, operations training, and orientation, among others. Recommendations are offered for further, more focused research of a quantitative nature.

Keywords

Exploratory; Management; Multi; Restaurant; Study; Training; Unit

Controlled Subject

Management; Business education

File Format

pdf

File Size

2703.36 KB

Degree Grantor

University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Language

English

Permissions

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Identifier

https://doi.org/10.25669/a73p-xwco


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