Award Date

1-1-2007

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science (MS)

Department

Environmental Science

First Committee Member

Vernon Hodge

Number of Pages

57

Abstract

Atmospheric plume dispersion models are used for a variety of purposes including emergency planning and response to hazardous material releases, determining force protection actions in the event of a WMD attack and for locating sources of pollution. This paper provides a review of previous studies that examine the accuracy of atmospheric plume dispersion models for chemical releases. It considers the principles used to derive air dispersion plume models and looks at three specific models currently in use; ALOHA, EPIcode and SCIPUFF. Results from this study indicate over-prediction bias by the EPIcode and SCIPUFF models and under-prediction bias by the ALOHA model. The experiment parameters were for near field dispersion, (less than 100 meters), in low wind speed conditions, (less than 2 meters per second).

Keywords

Atmospheric; Conditions; Dispersion; Low; Model; Speed; Validation; Wind

Controlled Subject

Environmental sciences; Atmospheric physics

File Format

pdf

File Size

1802.24 KB

Degree Grantor

University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Language

English

Permissions

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Identifier

https://doi.org/10.25669/wpzj-vqcx


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