Award Date

1-1-2008

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Arts (MA)

Department

Journalism and Media Studies

First Committee Member

Julian Kilker

Number of Pages

67

Abstract

This study examines the social uses and gratifications of text messaging. The study consisted of a seventeen item survey that was given to 150 students on the campus of the University of Nevada, Las Vegas between the ages of 18--31; I tested four hypotheses suggested that females were more likely than males to edit their messages before sending them (H1), use text because it is less engaging (H2), and use it to avoid an extended verbal conversation (H3) and that females use text messaging more than males (H4). A fifth hypothesis tested that text messaging is used more for personal use than professional use (H5). Five more hypotheses suggested that higher users of the technology were more likely to report using text messaging as a non-intrusive way to communicate (H6), have a backstage conversation with an onstage user (H7), maintain control over the conversation (H8), use it to escape those around them when in public (H9), and text message when they are not alone (H10); HI-H4 were not supported suggesting there is no significant difference between males and females. H5 was supported suggesting that text message was used for more personal reasons. H6--H10 were also supported suggesting that there was a significant difference between Higher and Low Users of the technology. Higher users were more likely to use text messaging as a non-intrusive way to communicate, have a backstage conversation with an onstage user, maintain control over the conversation, use it to escape those around them when in public, and text message when they are not alone.

Keywords

Gratifications; Messaging; Social; Text; Uses

Controlled Subject

Mass media

File Format

pdf

File Size

1228.8 KB

Degree Grantor

University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Language

English

Permissions

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Identifier

https://doi.org/10.25669/wvak-84xx


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