Award Date

1-1-2006

Degree Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Department

Educational Psychology

First Committee Member

Alice J. Corkill

Number of Pages

120

Abstract

Metacognitive monitoring may be a critical element in self-regulated learning. Two types of metacognitive monitoring have been identified: domain-specific and domain-general. Domain-specific metacognitive monitoring occurs when an individual is monitoring content-specific knowledge. Domain-general metacognitive monitoring occurs in situations when content-specific knowledge is not available. Currently no research is available that examines the developmental differences between domain-specific and domain-general metacognitive monitoring in children. This study attempted to address this issue by asking children in first, fourth, and seventh grade to make item-by-item confidence judgments while providing answers in two domain-specific tasks and two domain-general tasks. Two working memory spans tasks were also employed to control for maturational processes. Domain-specific metacognitive monitoring appeared earlier than domain-general metacognitive monitoring. Both domain-specific and domain-general metacognitive monitoring appear to benefit from experience because older students were more accurate metacognitive monitors and less overconfident than younger students. Maturational processes likely play a less significant role than experience in student improvement at metacognitive monitoring than previously thought.

Keywords

Development; Domain; Domain-specific; Metacognitive; Metacognitive Monitoring; Metacognitive Monitoring; Self-reflection; Specific

Controlled Subject

Educational psychology; Cognitive psychology; Developmental psychology

File Format

pdf

File Size

2273.28 KB

Degree Grantor

University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Language

English

Permissions

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Identifier

https://doi.org/10.25669/q8v3-9y1y


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