Award Date

1-1-1985

Degree Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Education (EdD)

Department

Educational Administration and Higher Education

Number of Pages

205

Abstract

The problem this study addressed was, what was the personal power management profile of selected successful community college presidents. In analyzation of this problem the power motivation and style theories of McClelland and Burnham, Blake and Mouton, and Hall and Hawker were used. The three sets of theorists had theorized about power motive and style and its implication for the "good or ideal" manager; The conjectures of these theorists and the practical writings of Fisher, Power In The Presidency, and Vaughn, The Community College Presidency, were applied to twenty community college presidents in the development of a power management profile. Through the use of an expert panel a sample of twenty successful presidents and three each of their direct line staff were identified. The presidents, his Dean of Instruction, Business Manager, and Dean of Students were surveyed with a biographical survey, and Hall and Hawker's test instruments, Power Management Profile (PMP), and the Power Management Inventory (PMI) descriptive statistics the data was analyzed and a profile resulted. The data was visually presented using Hall and Hawkers scoring graphs, as well as being narratively described. The results of the study indicated that no one single power profile was dominant or assures success. Perceptions of individual power motive and style differed greatly among the presidents themselves, as well as between the presidents and the subordinates, and among just the subordinates. A cumulative personal power management profile resulted from the work.

Keywords

College; Community; Motivation; Power; Presidents; Selected; Style; Successful

Controlled Subject

School management and organization; Community colleges

File Format

pdf

File Size

7915.52 KB

Degree Grantor

University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Language

English

Permissions

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Identifier

https://doi.org/10.25669/ch4e-5nwk


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