Award Date

1-1-1996

Degree Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Department

Mechanical Engineering

First Committee Member

R. L. Skaggs

Number of Pages

137

Abstract

The main reason for the utilization of stainless steels in many applications is due to their resistance to corrosion. Chromium is the main alloying element and stainless steel contains a minimum of 11%. Austenitic stainless steels, Type 300 series, contain nickel as the principal austenite former. The austenitic stainless steels possess better corrosion resistance than most of the chromium stainless steels. For this reason austenitic stainless steels are specified for more severe corrosion conditions in the process industries. Austenitic stainless steels, however, are susceptible to several forms of corrosion in chloride containing environments; This research focuses on the application of galvanic aluminized coatings through diffusion and thermal spray processes in order to improve the corrosion resistance of these stainless steels. Laboratory testing of general corrosion, crevice corrosion, corrosion fatigue and stress corrosion cracking (SCC), utilizing electrochemical and conventional testing methods was utilized to study aluminized coated Type 304 stainless steel in acidic synthetic seawaters at ambient temperature; The aluminized coatings, both diffusion and thermal spray, provided immunity to localized corrosion by pitting corrosion, crevice corrosion, corrosion fatigue and SCC. In addition, it was illustrated that the aluminized coatings provided corrosion immunity to sensitized type 304 stainless steel.

Keywords

Aluminized; Applied; Coat; Coatings; Corrosion; Diffusion; Galvanic; Modifying; Resistance; Spray; Stainless; Steel; Thermal

Controlled Subject

Materials science; Mechanical engineering; Materials science

File Format

pdf

File Size

3051.52 KB

Degree Grantor

University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Language

English

Permissions

If you are the rightful copyright holder of this dissertation or thesis and wish to have the full text removed from Digital Scholarship@UNLV, please submit a request to digitalscholarship@unlv.edu and include clear identification of the work, preferably with URL.

Identifier

https://doi.org/10.25669/iidu-4x19


Share

COinS