Award Date

1-1-1996

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Arts (MA)

Department

History

Number of Pages

145

Abstract

Japanese Americans of the interior West also faced perils during World War II, up to and including the possibility of internment and mass relocation. Although Nevada contained relatively few Japanese Americans at the outset of the war, the "Japanese question" received serious attention across the state. Early on, Nevadans grappled with the question of what to do about Japanese residents, and these debates spawned vastly different outcomes. In March 1942 the question changed, as many Nevadans began to fear and oppose an expected influx of "California Japs" (Japanese Americans the government was excluding from neighboring states). In this "free" interior state, however, irrational fears dissipated relatively quickly after the West Coast relocation ran its destructive course. This study describes these conflicting images and experiences of Japanese Americans in wartime Nevada, arguing that local history profoundly affected responses to both "Japanese questions.".

Keywords

American; Conflicting; Experience; Foes; Friends; Images; Invaders; Japanese; Neighbors; Nevada; Wartime; World War II

Controlled Subject

Ethnology--Study and teaching

File Format

pdf

File Size

4659.2 KB

Degree Grantor

University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Language

English

Permissions

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Identifier

https://doi.org/10.25669/n3if-jg0l


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