Award Date

1-1-1997

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Arts (MA)

Department

Anthropology and Ethnic Studies

Number of Pages

92

Abstract

Roasting pits in southern Nevada are commonly thought to have functioned to process agave. This assumption is based on the presence of agave quids, the proximity of roasting pits to agave stands, and on ethnographic accounts of agave roasting. Soil samples from two roasting pit complexes confirm this contention, and suggest a secondary use of the features to singe spines off cacti. These conclusions are supported by research on Arizona Strip and Hohokam roasting pits.

Keywords

Anasazi; Comparison; Complexes; Nevada; Paiute; Pit; Roasting; Southern; Southern Paiute; Agave

Controlled Subject

Archaeology; Ethnology; Indians of North America--Study and teaching

File Format

pdf

File Size

2058.24 KB

Degree Grantor

University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Language

English

Permissions

If you are the rightful copyright holder of this dissertation or thesis and wish to have the full text removed from Digital Scholarship@UNLV, please submit a request to digitalscholarship@unlv.edu and include clear identification of the work, preferably with URL.

Identifier

https://doi.org/10.25669/ufha-m9k8 processed, response: 201


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