Award Date

1-1-1999

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Arts (MA)

Department

Psychology

First Committee Member

Marta Meana

Number of Pages

54

Abstract

The present study examined the effects of labeling on pain tolerance, sensation, and affect for individuals who are high or low pain catastrophizers, as measured through the Pain Catastrophizing Scale (PCS). Pasticipants completed the PCS and were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 labeling conditions: A maximizing, a minimizing, and a neutral label condition. All participants then took part in a cold-pressor test. The cold-pressor measure of pain tolerance, as well as visual analog scales of sensory and affective ratings of pain, provided the dependent measures. Participants also completed the Anxiety Sensitivity Index (ASI) and the Somatic Amplification Questionnaire (SAQ). Results indicated that high pain catastrophizers have significantly reduced pain tolerance, increased pain sensations, and increased pain unpleasantness compared with low pain catastrophizers. In addition, significant correlations were found between the dependent measures. Main effects for labeling, and interaction effects between pain catastrophizing and labeling, were not supported.

Keywords

Affect; Catastrophizing; Effects; Labelings; Pain; Sensation; Tolerance

Controlled Subject

Clinical psychology; Psychophysiology; Cognitive psychology

File Format

pdf

File Size

1351.68 KB

Degree Grantor

University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Language

English

Permissions

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Identifier

https://doi.org/10.25669/gca4-bahr


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