Award Date

May 2018

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Architecture (MArch)

Department

Architecture

First Committee Member

Alfredo Fernández-González

Second Committee Member

Eric Weber

Third Committee Member

Joshua Vermillion

Fourth Committee Member

David James

Number of Pages

99

Abstract

This research evaluates the effects of varying thermal properties of windows in

residential energy use for the moderate altitude and 36'N latitude climate of southern

Nevada, which has a distinct cooling season. A selection of windows across different

shading conditions and total window areas were studied using BEopt energy simulation.

Findings demonstrate that for the specific climate, latitude, and altitude of Las Vegas,

Nevada, the most expensive “high performance” windows are not always the best

option in terms of total site energy use, and can be outperformed by properly shaded

less advanced windows. Under certain conditions, shading was found to decrease

required winter heating site energy to a greater degree than it reduced summer cooling

needs for the studied climate. This study was performed as part of the U.S. Department

of Energy Race To Zero Student Design Competition.

Keywords

Energy; Sustainability; Windows

Disciplines

Architecture | Sustainability

Language

English


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