Award Date

5-1-2019

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science (MS)

Department

Educational Psychology & Higher Education

First Committee Member

LeAnn Putney

Second Committee Member

Alice Corkill

Third Committee Member

CarolAnne Kardash

Fourth Committee Member

Wendy Hoskins

Number of Pages

223

Abstract

Current evidence supporting the efficacy of mindfulness training in the K-12 setting is quite limited. In addition there is a lack of theory that is committed explicitly to explaining how a direct mindfulness-achievement effect might appear. This study builds a promising foundation for helping address this gap in the existing literature. Framed within the context of a limited source model of self-regulation, academic achievement and perceptions of third, fourth, and, fifth graders participating in a 3-week mindfulness training program were examined across variables of executive control, and emotional regulation. Mindfulness training produced observed emotional and cognitive benefits, including increased executive control and decreased negative affect, which translated to improved academic performance at the third grade elementary level. The study occurred in an active school environment and results were analyzed through a series of mixed model analyses of variance. In addition, implications for future research are discussed.

Keywords

Attention; Ego-depletion; Executive control; Mindfulness; Self-regulation; Test anxiety

Disciplines

Educational Psychology

Language

English


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