Location

Greenspun College of Urban Affairs Lobby

Description

This research examines impediments to problem-solving initiatives within police organizations. A systematic evaluation of a complex problem-oriented policing project in Las Vegas, Nevada, is used to identify obstacles to developing effective crime reduction interventions. This evaluation focuses on the first three steps of the SARA problem-solving process: scanning, analysis, and response. At each stage of the project, interviews are conducted with key project personnel (e.g., area command captains, supervising sergeants, community-oriented policing officers, community partners, residents). Data is also collected through observations at community meetings and ride-alongs with officers assigned to the project. These data are analyzed and common themes are identified. The observed process is evaluated using the theoretical frameworks that form the basis of problem-oriented policing. Policy recommendations for both practitioners and researchers engaged in problem-solving initiatives are offered.

Keywords

Crime – Prevention; Nevada – Las Vegas; Police; Police-community relations; Problem-oriented policing

Disciplines

Criminology and Criminal Justice | Public Affairs, Public Policy and Public Administration | Urban Studies and Planning

Language

English

Comments

File: Poster

Attached file: Abstract

 
Apr 15th, 1:00 PM Apr 15th, 3:00 PM

Obstacles to Developing and Implementing Problem-Oriented Policing Projects in Police Agencies

Greenspun College of Urban Affairs Lobby

This research examines impediments to problem-solving initiatives within police organizations. A systematic evaluation of a complex problem-oriented policing project in Las Vegas, Nevada, is used to identify obstacles to developing effective crime reduction interventions. This evaluation focuses on the first three steps of the SARA problem-solving process: scanning, analysis, and response. At each stage of the project, interviews are conducted with key project personnel (e.g., area command captains, supervising sergeants, community-oriented policing officers, community partners, residents). Data is also collected through observations at community meetings and ride-alongs with officers assigned to the project. These data are analyzed and common themes are identified. The observed process is evaluated using the theoretical frameworks that form the basis of problem-oriented policing. Policy recommendations for both practitioners and researchers engaged in problem-solving initiatives are offered.