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Michael TorregrossaFollow

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Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein recently celebrated its two-hundredth anniversary, and its story remains vibrant in popular culture, especially in the comics medium. I’ve done a number of conference papers in the past devoted to representations of the Creature and his creator, Victor Frankenstein, in comics and comic art, but I’ve only recently begun to look at how the character of the Bride of Frankenstein has been depicted. I’d like to use this opportunity to further that work and look more closely at continuations and recastings of her story. The Bride has no chance at life in Shelley’s novel, as she is aborted by Victor. She briefly experiences life in the film Bride of Frankenstein, but that is also terminated. However, the comics have allowed her an extratextual existence beyond the limits of these earlier works. She thrives and flourishes in continuations of Frankenstein. Sometimes, she merely makes a cameo appearance, but in other works she is more vital to the narrative, acting either to save the world or damn it. Further, new versions of the character also populate various recastings. Often, her surrogates merely don her costume, yet a growing number are more active, again making an impact. All of these comics illustrate the vitally of the Bride and her power to inspire creators of the comics. I hope to be able to share these with you.


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She Lives: Bringing the Bride of Frankenstein to Life in the Comics

Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein recently celebrated its two-hundredth anniversary, and its story remains vibrant in popular culture, especially in the comics medium. I’ve done a number of conference papers in the past devoted to representations of the Creature and his creator, Victor Frankenstein, in comics and comic art, but I’ve only recently begun to look at how the character of the Bride of Frankenstein has been depicted. I’d like to use this opportunity to further that work and look more closely at continuations and recastings of her story. The Bride has no chance at life in Shelley’s novel, as she is aborted by Victor. She briefly experiences life in the film Bride of Frankenstein, but that is also terminated. However, the comics have allowed her an extratextual existence beyond the limits of these earlier works. She thrives and flourishes in continuations of Frankenstein. Sometimes, she merely makes a cameo appearance, but in other works she is more vital to the narrative, acting either to save the world or damn it. Further, new versions of the character also populate various recastings. Often, her surrogates merely don her costume, yet a growing number are more active, again making an impact. All of these comics illustrate the vitally of the Bride and her power to inspire creators of the comics. I hope to be able to share these with you.