Award Date

1-1-2006

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Arts (MA)

Department

Anthropology

First Committee Member

J. Thompson

Number of Pages

185

Abstract

The investigation of historical cemeteries enables direct assessment of biological variability, health and disease, and additional insights into populations that have gone relatively undocumented in North America and elsewhere. This thesis examines a historic cemetery located in northern Nevada, in the town of Carlin. A total of 13 well-preserved skeletal individuals were excavated in 1996, all buried within coffins and whose Chinese origin has been confirmed through historical documentation and associated artifacts (Chung et al. 2005). Although the sample size is small, it provides a number of important insights into the health and behavior of early Chinese-American communities, including dental pathologies, generalized bone disease, age and occupational-related pathologies, and trauma. In addition to paleopathological analysis, a craniometric study was conducted to better understand biological variation. This thesis is unique in that there are few comparative populations that have examined skeletal biology of early Chinese Americans.

Keywords

Assessment; Bioanthropological; Carlin; Cemetery; Chinese; Forgotten; Nevada

Controlled Subject

Physical anthropology

File Format

pdf

File Size

7065.6 KB

Degree Grantor

University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Language

English

Permissions

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Identifier

https://doi.org/10.25669/gpfa-vsz2


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