Award Date

1-1-1992

Degree Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Education (EdD)

Department

Educational Administration and Higher Education

First Committee Member

Anthony Saville

Number of Pages

154

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to establish 16PF personality profiles for superintendents of large and small public school districts from eleven western states, and to determine the significant differences, if any, between the profiles; Sixteen null hypotheses were formulated based on the sixteen primary personality factors of the 16PF. The first of these hypotheses was: There was no significant difference between the mean score of superintendents from large public school districts and the mean score of superintendents from small public school districts on Factor A, Social Orientation, of the 16PF a significance level of.05. The remaining fifteen hypotheses were stated similarly utilizing the other fifteen personality factors; Data was gathered, using the Sixteen Personality Factor Questionnaire, from sixty superintendents, thirty from large school districts and thirty from small school districts, selected from the states of Washington, Oregon, California, Idaho, Nevada, Utah, Arizona, Montana, Wyoming, Colorado, and New Mexico; Conclusions. Several conclusions were evident from the analysis of the data in the study. (1) There was a significant difference between the mean scores of superintendents on Factor B, Ability to Discern Relationships, of the 16PF. This implied that superintendents from large school districts were more abstract thinking, more intelligent, and showed better judgment than superintendents from small school districts. (2) There was a significant difference between the mean scores of superintendents on Factor C, Adaptation to the Environment, of the 16PF. This indicated that superintendents from large school districts were more calm, more emotionally stable and mature, and less affected by feelings than superintendents from small school districts. (3) There was a significant difference between the mean scores of superintendents on Factor I, Emotional Sensitivity, of the 16PF. This suggested that superintendents from large school districts were more tender-minded, more sensitive, and more sentimental than superintendents from small school districts. (4) There was a significant difference between the mean scores of superintendents on Factor Q1, Orientation Toward Change, of the 16PF. This indicated that superintendents from large school districts were more experimenting and more open to change, less conservative, and less tradition bound than superintendents from small school districts.

Keywords

District; Investigation; Personalities; Public; School; Selected; States; Superintendents; United; Western

Controlled Subject

School management and organization; Personality

Disciplines

Higher Education

File Format

pdf

File Size

4.34 MB

Degree Grantor

University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Language

English

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